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RCASA’s Wednesday Outreach: Adolescent Prevention Curriculum’s

In Advocacy, Education, Outreach, Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 30, 2010 at 8:00 am

Launched nationally in May 2006, CDC’s Choose Respect initiative has come a long way in a short time. Findings from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that approximately one in 11 high school students reported being victims of physical dating violence during the 12 months preceding the survey, equating to nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide (1). Those victimized by a dating partner were more likely to engage in episodic heavy drinking, suicide attempts, physical fighting, and current sexual activity (1).

Recently the initiative was awarded the CINE Golden Eagle Award for the public service announcement (PSA) Just Talk.

Just Talk targets parents by encouraging them to learn about dating abuse, talk to their kids about how dating abuse can happen, and teach their kids how to choose respect in all their relationships. In English, Just Talk is available in 30- and 60-second lengths.

Choose Respect is an initiative that seeks to help adolescents form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts. The initiative reaches out to adolescents, ages 11 to 14, at a time when they are still forming attitudes and beliefs that will affect how they are treated and how they treat others. The initiative also connects with parents, teachers, youth leaders, and other caregivers who influence the lives of young teens.

Dating violence in adolescents also has been linked to lifelong patterns of violence that carry over into other relationships (2). Healthy relationship skills can have a beneficial effect on the ability of adolescents to prevent dating violence (2).

Choose Respect provides information and support for communities seeking to foster a “Culture of Respect.” Focusing on adolescents between the ages of 11 and 14, Choose Respect provides educational information for the development of healthy relationships, skills for managing conflict, anger, and jealousy without violence.

Choose Respect encourages the early development of healthy attitudes, behaviors, and skills (e.g., negotiation or compromise) to help youth interact positively and treat others with respect. The initiative tools are designed to complement other community prevention strategies to change social norms and encourage healthy relationships.

References

  1. CDC. Physical dating violence among high school students—United States, 2003. MMWR 2006;55:532–5.
  2. Wekerle C, Wolfe DA. Dating violence in mid-adolescence: theory, significance, and emerging prevention initiatives. Clin Psychol Rev 1999;19:435–56.

The currciculm from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Choose Respect Campaign contains a DVD of two video programs and materials CD, with a Choose Respect discussion guide, PowerPoint slides, and appendices. These activities will motivate participants to come up with ways to promote healthy and respectful relationships in their community.

Choose Respect DVD – Causing Pain: Real Stories of Dating Abuse and Violence, is an award-winning program. This program features true stories of youth, parents, and professionals who have been in, or witnessed, abusive relationships. The video utilizes their experiences and insights so that youth and parents can recognize and prevent dating abuse in their own lives, or in the lives of others.

  • Adult version: 30 minute program
  • Youth version: 13 minute program

Causing Pain: Real Stories of Dating Abuse and Violence Discussion Guide CD

The discussion guide, and accompanying PowerPoint presentation, helps participants recall specific scenes and generate thoughtful conversations about indentifying warning signs and preventing abusive relationships. The discussion guide includes: background for session leaders, helpful hints for addressing the subject of dating abuse and violence, instructions for facilitating group discussions, and interactive activities.

  • Section One provides session leaders with the facts about dating abuse, healthy relationships, and helps with presentation and discussion preparation
  • Section Two aids in outlining the differences in presenting Choose Respect to a youth or adult group, and demonstrates how to get the discussion flowing with an icebreaker, setting ground rules for discussion, and presenting an overview of the Choose Respect initiative
  • Section Three gives participants a chance to talk about the characters in the video and the overall topic of dating abuse and healthy relationships through activities to promote Choose Respect

PowerPoint Presentation– Provides everything a presenter needs to engage the audience in conversation surrounding the components of Choose Respect and promote dialogue about healthy and positive relationships

Dating Abuse and Violence Discussion Handouts and Worksheets

The Causing Pain: Real Stories of Dating Abuse & Violence video is a recipient of two FREDDIE Awards for its content, educational value, originality and production quality, and was also nominated for an Emmy Award.

Safe Dates can be used as a dating abuse prevention tool for both male and female middle- and high-school students. Safe Dates would fit well within a health education, family life skills, or general life skills curriculum. The curriculum consists of five components:

• A nine-session dating abuse curriculum
• A play about dating abuse
• A poster contest
• Parent materials
• A teacher training outline

Because dating violence is often tied to the abuse of alcohol and other drugs, you may want to consider using Safe Dates in conjunction with alcohol and other drug prevention programs, as well as any other general violence prevention programs. A school counselor could offer Safe Dates as part of a support group or counseling/education program or it could be used in after school, community youth enrichment, and faith-based youth programs. Safe Dates could also be used as an intervention tool at domestic abuse or crisis centers, in juvenile diversion programs, and with victim support groups.

The goals of this program are

  • To raise student awareness of what constitutes healthy and abusive dating
    relationships.
  • To raise student awareness of dating abuse and its causes and consequences.
  • To equip students with the skills and resources to help themselves or friends in abusive dating relationships.
  • To equip students with the skills to develop healthy dating relationships, including positive communication, anger management, and conflict resolution.

Safe Dates is an evidence-based program with strong, long-term outcomes. It was the subject of substantial formative research in fourteen public schools in North Carolina using a rigorous experimental design. The program was found to be effective in both preventing and reducing perpetration among teens already using violence against their dates.

Adolescents participating in the program, as compared with those who did not participate, also reported:

  • less acceptance of dating violence
  • stronger communication and anger management skills
  • less gender stereotyping
  • greater awareness of community services for dating abuse

Researchers studied the same group of students four years after implementation and found that students who participated in the Safe Dates program reported 56 percent to 92 percent less physical, serious physical, and sexual dating violence victimization and perpetration than teens who did not participate in Safe Dates. The program has been found to be equally effective for males and females

Session 1: Defining Caring Relationships
Through a bingo game and class discussions, students are introduced to the Safe Dates program and they evaluate how they would like to be treated in dating relationships.

Session 2: Defining Dating Abuse
Through the discussion of scenarios and the review of statistics, students clearly define dating abuse.

Session 3: Why Do People Abuse?
Through large and small group discussions and the review of scenarios, students identify the causes and consequences of dating abuse.

Session 4: How to Help Friends
Through a decision-making exercise, a dramatic reading, and the introduction of the “Friend’s Wheel,” students learn why it is difficult to leave abusive relationships and how to help a friend if she or he is in an abusive relationship.

Session 5: Helping Friends
Through stories and role-playing, students practice effective skills for helping friends who are victims of abuse or confronting friends who are perpetrators of abuse.

Session 6: Overcoming Gender Stereotypes
Through a writing exercise, small-group discussions, and scenarios, students learn about gender stereotypes and how these stereotypes can affect dating relationships.

Session 7: Equal Power through Communication
Students learn the eight skills for effective communication and practice these skills in a variety of role-plays.

Session 8: How We Feel, How We Deal
Through the use of a feelings diary and a discussion of “hot buttons,” students learn effective ways to recognize and handle their anger, so it doesn’t lead to abusive behavior.

Session 9: Preventing Sexual Assault
Through taking a quiz and holding a caucus and a panel of their peers, students learn about the issue of sexual assault and how to prevent it from happening.

Dating Abuse Play
As part of the Safe Dates program, a forty-five-minute play about dating abuse and violence, which was written by high school drama students will be presented. Before presenting the play, RCASA will share local statistics on the prevalence of teen dating abuse. Following the performance,  the actors will lead discussions (preferably in small groups), with the audience about the issues presented in the play.

Poster Contest
Hosting a poster contest is a great way to reinforce the concepts learned in the curriculum. Posters on the theme of dating abuse prevention can be displayed in school hallways or other community buildings such as libraries, city hall or community centers, and shopping malls. Students can also use their posters when giving presentations to various school or community groups.

Parent Materials
As in every strong prevention effort, it is important to get your students’ parents or guardians involved in your Safe Dates program. Included with the curriculum is a parent education brochure that we can send to parents or keep on hand, in case we need to talk to a parent about this issue. There is also a parent letter that informs parents of the Safe Dates program.

Teacher Training Outline
RCASA is  multiplying our efforts by training others to use the Safe Dates curriculum. An outline for a three-hour training is provided in the curriculum. We will be hosting  training sessions for area schools and other other local community youth organizations.

In Touch With Teens Violence Prevention curriculum will be implemented in community based youth organizations. The eight-unit curriculum empowers youth to have healthy relationships by providing information about power and control, elements of healthy relationships and healthy sexuality, and media literacy as well as education on sexual harassment, sexual assault, and dating violence. The curriculum further addresses the development of pro-social skills such as empathy, impulse control, effective communication, problem solving, and bystander accountability.

The In Touch With Teens curriculum was selected as one of five model youth-violence prevention programs in the United States  by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It was also selected as the relationship-violence curriculum for the ‘Life Skills for the 21st Century’ curriculum of the Los Angeles Unified School District

Unit 1-Roots of Violence: Global & Local

The purpose of this unit is to bring some understanding to teens regarding the root causes of violence occurring in broader society.

Unit 2-Roots of Violence: Power & Control

The purpose of this unit is to explore the dynamics of power and control within a relationship and to determine when behavior becomes abusive and harmful.

Unit 3-Relationship Violence

The purpose of this unit is to challenge commonly held myths teens have regarding frequency and severity of violence in their dating relationships. By altering their attitudes regarding violence and relationships, teens will take the first step toward affecting and promoting change.

Unit 4- Cycle of Violence

The purpose of this unit is to provide teens with the foundation for understanding the Cycle of Violence, and how it traps people in relationships. Knowing how the Cycle of Violence works will aid teens in recognizing and preventing potentially abusive relationships.

Unit 5-Sexual Harassment

The purpose of this unit is to help teens define and identify sexual harassment. It also encourages teens to talk about how harassment makes them feel, and assists teens in developing options and responses to sexual harassment.

Unit 6-Issues of Sexual Assault & Coercive Control

The purpose of this unit is to explore basic issues surrounding sexual assault. By challenging current beliefs about sexual assaults, the facilitator can guide students through a process of reeducation and help them to rethink commonly held misconceptions regarding sexual assault.

Unit 7-Media Impact on Gender & Violence

The purpose of this unit is to explore how media impacts violence in our society and influences our perceptions of ourselves and others.

Unit 8-Building Blocks of a Healthy Relationship

This unit will provide information for teens to help them establish criteria to determine what a healthy relationship is and ways to maintain healthy relationships.

All three of these curriculum’s are promising in Adolescent Prevention and RCASA is utilizing them all. Please do not hesitate to contact us for more information on any of these curriculum’s and how we can help you to implement them in your particular setting. 540.371.6771.

Tuesdays With Traci: Loving Ourselves Unconditionally

In Advocacy, Art therapy, Education, Outreach, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 28, 2010 at 10:44 am

Love yourself into health and a good life of your own.  Love yourself into relationships that work for you and the other person.  Love yourself into peace, happiness, joy, success, and contentment.

Love yourself into all that you always wanted.  We can stop treating ourselves the way others treated us, if they behaved in a less than healthy, desirable way.  If we have learned to see ourselves critically, conditionally, and in a diminishing and punishing way, it’s time to stop.  Other people treated us that way, but it’s even worse to treat ourselves that way now.

Loving ourselves may seem foreign, even foolish at times.  People may accuse us of being selfish.  We don’t have to believe them.  People who love themselves are truly able to love others and let others love them.  People who love themselves and hold themselves in high esteem are those who give the most, contribute the most, love the most.

How do we love ourselves?  By forcing it at first.  By faking it if necessary.  By “acting as if.”  By working as hard at loving and liking ourselves as we have at not liking ourselves.  Explore what it means to love yourself.  Do things for yourself that reflect compassionate, nurturing, self-love.

Embrace and love all of  yourself- past, present, and future.  Forgive yourself quickly and as often as necessary.  Encourage yourself.  Tell yourself good things about yourself.  If we think and believe negative ideas, get them out in the open quickly and honestly, so we can replace those beliefs with better ones.  Pat yourself on the back when necessary.  Discipline yourself when necessary.  Ask for help, for time; ask for what you need.

Sometimes, give yourself treats.  Do not treat yourself like a pack mule, always pushing and driving harder.  Learn to be good to yourself.  Choose behaviors with preferable consequences-treating yourself well is one.  Learn to stop your  pain, even when that means making difficult decisions.  Do not unnecessarily deprive yourself.  Sometimes, give yourself what you want, just because you want it.  Stop explaining and justifying yourself.  When you make mistakes, let them go.  We learn, we grow, and we learn some more.  And through it all, we love ourselves.

We work at it, then work at it some more.  One day we’ll wake up, look in the mirror, and find that loving ourselves has become habitual.  We’re now living with a person who give and receives love, because that person loves him- or herself.  Self-love will take hold and become a guiding force in our life.

¿Por qué es importante hablar sobre sexo con mis hijos?

In Education, Hispanic/Latino, Outreach, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 28, 2010 at 9:00 am

¿Por qué es importante hablar sobre sexo con mis hijos?

Los adolescentes informan que ellos preferirían recibir información acerca del sexo directamente de sus padres en vez que de otras fuentes.

• Los jóvenes que se sienten conectados y apoyados en su hogar desarrollan actitudes y comportamientos saludables, y a diferencia de otros jóvenes, demorarán en tener relaciones sexuales.

• Cuando las madres discuten acerca el uso del condón antes que los jóvenes se vuelvan sexualmente activos, son tres veces más probables al usar condones que esos jóvenes usarán condones a diferencia de aquellos jóvenes cuyos padres no les informaron acerca del uso del condón o conversaron acerca del uso de condones después de volverse sexualmente activos.

• Los adolescentes que han hablado el sobre tema de la sexualidad con sus padres previamente, son siete veces más probable que se comuniquen con su pareja acerca de VIH/SIDA que aquellos que no han tenido esas conversaciones con sus padres.

¿Cuándo debo hablar de sexo?

• Nunca es muy pronto ni muy tarde para hablar de sexo con sus hijos. Estas conversaciones ayudan a crear una base de comportamiento saludable durante toda su vida.

• Los niños hacen preguntas acerca de sexualidad en los momentos más inesperados. Dígales que le alegra que pregunte, diles una respuesta breve y dígales que pueden hablar más adelante, cumpla dándole una explicación correcta pero apropiada para su edad.

La educación sexual adecuada es importante en cada edad y etapa del desarrollo.

Entre lo de los jóvenes 13 y 17 años de edad la mayoría:

• Completarán la pubertad y la transición física entre la niñez y la edad adulta.

• Continúan siendo infl uenciados por los jóvenes de su edad (pares) y los medios de comunicación.

• Trabajarán en sus aptitudes para convertirse en autosufi cientes, desarrollarán relaciones adultas y buscarán obtener mayor poder sobre sus propias vidas.

Entre los 9 y 12 años de edad los jóvenes:

• Entrarán a la pubertad: es un tiempo donde aumenta la producción de hormonas. La piel se pone grasosa y saldrán granos y espinillas; empiezan a transpirar más y los jóvenes tendrán olor corporal y les empezará a crecer pelo púbico.

• Cambios en el cuerpo como:

♦ Varones: crecimiento de los genitales, el escroto se oscurece, cambio de voz, erecciones y producción de esperma, eyaculación y sueños húmedos son más frecuentes.

♦ Hembras: maduración de los genitales, se desarrollan los senos, comienza el ciclo de ovulación y menstrual.

Manteniendo una discusión abierta sobre educación sexual con nuestros hijos:

• Cuando las madres discuten acerca el uso del condón antes que los jóvenes se vuelvan sexualmente activos, son tres veces más probables al usar condones que esos jóvenes usarán condones a diferencia de aquellos jóvenes cuyos padres no les informaron acerca del uso del condón o conversaron acerca del uso de condones después de volverse sexualmente activos.

• Los adolescentes que han hablado el sobre tema de la sexualidad con sus padres previamente, son siete veces más probable que se comuniquen con su pareja acerca de VIH/SIDA que aquellos que no han tenido esas conversaciones con sus padres.

¿Cuándo debo hablar de sexo?

• Nunca es muy pronto ni muy tarde para hablar de sexo con sus hijos. Estas conversaciones ayudan a crear una base de comportamiento saludable durante toda su vida.

• Los niños hacen preguntas acerca de sexualidad en los momentos más inesperados. Dígales que le alegra que pregunte, diles una respuesta breve y dígales que pueden hablar más adelante, cumpla dándole una explicación correcta pero apropiada para su edad.

¿Por qué es importante hablar sobre sexo con mis hijos?

• Los adolescentes informan que ellos preferirían recibir información acerca del sexo directamente de sus padres en vez que de otras fuentes.

• Los jóvenes que se sienten conectados y apoyados en su hogar desarrollan actitudes y comportamientos saludables, y a diferencia de otros jóvenes, demorarán en tener relaciones sexuales.

La educación sexual adecuada es importante en cada edad y etapa del desarrollo.

Entre lo de los jóvenes 13 y 17 años de edad la mayoría:

• Completarán la pubertad y la transición física entre la niñez y la edad adulta.

• Continúan siendo influenciados por los jóvenes de su edad (pares) y los medios de comunicación.

• Trabajarán en sus aptitudes para convertirse en autosuficientes, desarrollarán relaciones adultas y buscarán obtener mayor poder sobre sus propias vidas.

Entre los 9 y 12 años de edad los jóvenes:

• Entrarán a la pubertad: es un tiempo donde aumenta la producción de hormonas.  La piel se pone grasosa y saldrán granos y espinillas; empiezan a transpirar más y los jóvenes tendrán olor corporal y les empezará a crecer pelo púbico.

• Cambios en el cuerpo como:

♦ Varones: crecimiento de los genitales, el escroto se oscurece, cambio de voz, erecciones y producción de esperma, eyaculación y sueños húmedos son más frecuentes.

♦ Hembras: maduración de los genitales, se desarrollan los senos, comienza el ciclo de ovulación y menstrual.

Consejos para comunicarse con sus hijos adolescentes:

1) Usted es el educador sexual principal para sus hijos adolescentes.  Ellos quieren hablar con usted acerca de la sexualidad y escuchar sus valores.

2) Encuentre “Momentos para la enseñanza”.  Hablar de sexo no tiene que ser una conversación formal. Libros, los programas de televisión y artículos en el periódico, pueden ser unos iniciadores de conversación maravillosos.

3) Hable pronto, hable a menudo.  Nunca es muy temprano, y nunca es demasiado. No espere que su hijo pregunte, porque muchos nunca lo harán.

4) Sea “preguntable.”  Recompense las preguntas con, “me alegro que me hayas preguntado”. Esto le enseñará a sus hijos a recurrir a usted cuando tengan otras preguntas.

5) Hágalo normal.  Hablar de sexualidad es tan normal como hablar de otros aspectos en la vida adolescente.

6) Escuche más de lo que hable.  Pregúnteles qué desean saber. No juzgue, sólo escuche.

7) Hable con otros padres.  Ellos son un gran recurso para apoyo e información.

8 ) Use la terminología específi ca y correcta.  Use vocabulario común para que pueda tener un buen nivel de entendimiento con su hijo.

9) Esté enterada de lo que enseñan en la escuela.  Muchas escuelas no enseñan salud sexual.

Usted es el primer recurso que tiene su hijo.

Information extracted and modified from: http://www.birdsandbees.org/brochures/talktokids_sp.pdf

Información reproducida y modificada de la página electrónica: http://www.birdsandbees.org/brochures/talktokids_sp.pdf

Para propósitos de socializar en la red acerca de prevención, educación y concientización sobre sexualidad en nuestra comunidad adolescente.

Si alguna iglesia u otra organización de nuestra comunidad desea impartir clases de educación sexual a los padres de jóvenes adolescentes o a ellos mismos y estos son estudiantes de Inglés como Segundo Idioma pueden llamarnos al (540) 371-1666 o al (540) 371-6771 para impartir estas clases.

Las clases escolares de educación sexual en español podemos impartirlas en el Otoño.

Si tiene preguntas o necesita de nuestros servicios por favor llámenos a nuestra línea de ayuda al: (540) 371-1666

RCASA’s Saturday Prevention: Rape Victims Can Also Be Male…

In Advocacy, Education, Outreach, Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 26, 2010 at 8:00 am

Some Rape Victims have to deal with more than being a victim. For some, it’s the fact that they’re a man. People who know very little about male rape believe most victims are prisoners, homosexuals, or little kids. They’re wrong. Experts believe that 10% of all rape victims are men. And men who are raped face a natural aftermath of anger, self-doubt and fear. Just like women. Because they’re men, and because people believe men “don’t get raped, ” victims are especially hesitant to report the crime.

Adult male victims face a greater degree of violence with rape, and the amount of force used increases with the victim’s age. Lives are often threatened. Homosexuality has nothing to do with male rape. The majority of victims are heterosexual; likewise for offenders. And, there is no reason for a victim’s sexual identity to change. What is important to remember is sexual arousal is a physiological reaction that can be triggered by fear as well as desire. It in no way means a victim enjoyed being attacked. Regardless of whether you intend to prosecute, you should have medical evidence collected with 48 hours.

Sadly, there is no easy answer. Assault victims have different ways of coping and recover at different rates. However, most say that in the months following their attack, they feel up one day, down the next. At first, some feel dirty or guilty. Most feel fearful. Angry. Depressed. Out of control. Unable to cope. Reactions may continue to appear from six weeks to a year or more. Symptoms may come and go, which is a sign of adjustment.

RCASA’s Friday Facts: Elder Abuse

In Advocacy, Education, Friday Facts, Outreach, Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 25, 2010 at 8:00 am

Tens of thousands of seniors across the United States are being abused: harmed in some substantial way often people who are directly responsible for their care.
More than half a million reports of abuse against elderly Americans reach authorities every year, and millions more cases go unreported.

As elders become more physically frail, they’re less able to stand up to bullying and or fight back if attacked. They may not see or hear as well or think as clearly as they used to, leaving openings for unscrupulous people to take advantage of them. Mental or physical ailments may make them more trying companions for the people who live with them.

Elder abuse tends to take place where the senior lives: most often in the home where abusers are apt to be adult children; other family members such as grandchildren; or spouses/partners of elders. Institutional settings especially long-term care facilities can also be sources of elder abuse.

Sexual elder abuse is contact with an elderly person without the elder’s consent. Such contact can involve physical sex acts, but activities such as showing an elderly person pornographic material, forcing the person to watch sex acts, or forcing the elder to undress are also considered sexual elder abuse.

At first, you might not recognize or take seriously signs of elder abuse. They may appear to be symptoms of dementia or signs of the elderly person’s frailty — or caregivers may explain them to you that way. In fact, many of the signs and symptoms of elder abuse do overlap with symptoms of mental deterioration, but that doesn’t mean you should dismiss them on the caregiver’s say-so.

The following are warning signs of some kind of elder abuse:

  • Frequent arguments or tension between the caregiver and the elderly person
  • Changes in personality or behavior in the elder
  • Threatening, belittling, or controlling caregiver behavior that you witness
  • Behavior from the elder that mimics dementia, such as rocking, sucking, or mumbling to oneself
  • Bruises around breasts or genitals
  • Unexplained venereal disease or genital infection
  • Unexplained vaginal or anal bleeding
  • Torn, stained, or bloody underclothing

It’s difficult to take care of a senior when he or she has many different needs, and it’s difficult to be elderly when age brings with it infirmities and dependence. Both the demands of caregiving and the needs of the elder can create situations in which abuse is more likely to occur.

If you or someone you know is being abused, neglected, or exploited, tell at least one person. Tell your doctor, a friend, or a family member whom you trust. Other people care and can help you.

You can also call Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677-1116.

The person who answers the phone will refer you to a local agency that can help. The Eldercare Locator answers the phone Monday through Friday, 9 am to 8 pm, Eastern Time.

RCASA’s Wednesday Outreach: In Search of Spanish Speaking Crisis Responders

In Advocacy, Employment, Outreach on June 23, 2010 at 8:00 am

RCASA is currently looking for part-time hospital crisis responders.

Summary of Duties

The Crisis Responder provides immediate crisis response advocacy services to survivors of sexual assault and their loved ones as part of the agency’s 24-hour hotline and hospital accompaniment services. She or he is also responsible for providing support and information to RCASA Victim Advocate Volunteers when on duty.

Responsibilities

  • Shifts – Signs up for a set number of  overnight and weekend  shifts.  Responsibilities include communicating with volunteers and Answering Service, taking special/sensitive hotline calls, and providing medical accompaniment (hospital calls) when requested.
  • Crisis intervention – provides advocacy and emotional support, gives information and is a referral resource for survivors, families and other individuals involved in the case.   Responds to all requests to accompany victims to medical care and evidence collection at local hospital or child advocacy centers.
  • Follows all agency policies and procedures – maintains strict confidentiality regarding client information, honors the agency Code of Professional Ethics for Victim Advocates.
  • Sustains knowledge of agency programs and services, as well as area referral resources.
  • Paperwork – Fills out  all appropriate VA Data forms for all hotline, and face-to-face contacts, and turns them into the agency within 24 hours.
  • Attendance at Meetings Is an active participant in scheduled supervision meetings and staff meetings. Provides staff support at agency events as requested by supervising staff.
  • General Office Duties – provides general office support to the victim services division or other divisions as requested.
  • Other duties as assigned by Supervisor or Executive Director.

Qualifications

  • Demonstrated ability to handle crisis calls, remain calm & non-judgmental.
  • Must have own transportation.
  • Must have cell phone.
  • Must be willing to go to the hospital at all hours of the night during your shift.
  • Must be fluent in Spanish.
  • Able to handle multi-phone system, perform basic office skills, is computer literate.
  • Advanced knowledge of sexual violence issues.
  • Graduate of RCASA’s 40-hour advocate skill building training.
  • Excellent oral & written communication skills, work both independently and with a team.

If you are interested in this position please email us at jobs@rcasa.org or call 540.371.6771.

RCASA’s Tuesdays with Traci: Surrender

In Education, Outreach, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 22, 2010 at 8:00 am

Master the lessons of your present circumstances.

We do not move forward by resisting what is undesirable in our life today. We move forward, we grow, we change by acceptance.

Avoidance is not the key; surrender opens the door.

Listen to this truth: We are each in our present circumstances for a reason. There is a lesson, a valuable lesson, that must be learned before we can move forward.

Something important is being worked out in us, and in those around us. We may not be able to identify it today, but we can know what is important. We can know it is good.

Overcome not by force, overcome by surrender. The battle is fought, and won, inside ourselves. We must go through it until we learn, until we accept, until we become  grateful, until we are set free.

Trauma Sexual Militar y la Compensación por Discapacidad para Excombatientes

In Education, Hispanic/Latino, Outreach, Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness on June 21, 2010 at 9:00 am

Trauma Sexual Militar

Descripción del Programa
El Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos (VA, por sus siglas en inglés) presta servicios de atención médica para aquellos casos que son consecuencia de experiencias de agresión sexual o de acoso sexual repetido y amenazante durante el servicio militar. Se ofrecen tratamientos gratuitos de salud física y mental (incluidos los medicamentos) para hombres y mujeres que hayan vivido estas experiencias.

Puede solicitar el estado de incapacidad relacionado con el servicio por condiciones que fueran consecuencia de un trauma sexual militar, pero la atención gratuita no depende de que la condición esté relacionada con el servicio. Visite la página de “Compensación por Discapacidad para Excombatientes” para obtener más información sobre cómo solicitar el beneficio.

Requisitos Generales del Programa
Se aplican reglas de elegibilidad especiales. Puede tener derecho a recibir este beneficio aun si no es elegible para otros servicios que ofrece VA. Incluso los veteranos con bajas no honorables pueden llegar a ser elegibles. No hay requisitos de antigüedad en el servicio, de ingresos, u otros requisitos de elegibilidad estándar. Usted no tiene que estar conectado con el servicio ni haber recibido un diagnóstico específico (p.ej. PTSD, trastorno por estrés postraumático).

No es necesario que los incidentes hayan sido informados al momento de los hechos, y no necesita presentar ninguna documentación como evidencia. La situación de Trauma Sexual Militar (MST, por sus siglas en inglés) puede haber sucedido en la base o fuera de ella y mientras estuviera de servicio o no. La relación entre el autor y la víctima no es un factor de elegibilidad para ser beneficiario de los cuidados.

No hay límites respecto de la duración del tratamiento para las condiciones relacionadas con MST.

Para obtener más información, visite el sitio web de Consejería para Casos de Trauma Sexual Militar (en inglés).

Sus Pasos Siguientes

La información a continuación lo guiará a los pasos siguientes para solicitar este beneficio.

Proceso de Solicitar
Para obtener más información sobre cómo solicitar los beneficios de este programa, contacte al Coordinador de Trauma Sexual Militar o al Director del Programa de Veteranas en su establecimiento local de VA (en inglés).

Información de Contacto del Programa
Para obtener más información, envíe su pregunta por Internet o consulte el listado de Preguntas Comunes (en inglés):
https://iris.va.gov/scripts/iris.cfg/php.exe/enduser/cci/ask_1.php?p_sid=Zn…

También puede llamarnos a este teléfono (en inglés):
1-877-222-8387

Agencia Administrativa
Administración de Salud de Veteranos
http://www1.va.gov/health

Si usted vive en una base militar y solamente habla español, puede llamarnos con cualquier pregunta al (540) 371-1666, nosotros trataremos de ayudarle.

__________________________________________________________________________________

Reproducido por RCASA (540) 371-1666 para propositos educativos y de socialización ha través de la internet de la fuente informativa: http://www.govbenefits.gov/govbenefits_es.portal;jsessionid=sL9jLjcZykngNdZ4k9yny2Z7rx2QdF3Qvg10kCTyQ8b3SC1LQnL6!-159400225?_nfpb=true&locateFederalFlow_2_actionOverride=%2FLocateFederalFlow%2Freport&_windowLabel=locateFederalFlow_2&locateFederalFlow_2bid=4749&locateFederalFlow_2_code=11&_pageLabel=gbcc_page_locate_federal


Family and Childrens Trust Fund recognition of our Latino Program

In Advocacy, Hispanic/Latino on June 20, 2010 at 8:16 am

On June 15th, RCASA’s staff won an award from the Family and Children’s Trust Fund  (FACT) for innovative community collaboration to prevent family violence in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  This recognition is for our Latino’s Services program and community collaborations to create and implement the program.  Last year and the year before, FACT provided funding for RCASA to outreach the Latino community to provide services for sexual assault and sexual abuse victims.

Our Community Partners

RCDV have always provided us invaluable technical advice to design services that were unique for the community and overcome access and language barriers.  They were helpful as we began to seek funding and develop services.

Madre Tierra (Mother Earth) lent us Dilcia Molina, who spent weekly time in the agency helping us develop and implement outreach services.  She remains an invaluable liaison between our agency and the Latino community and volunteer for RCASA.

University of Mary Washington Spanish Club – provided technical support and students to teach some basic phrases in Spanish to help English speaking hotline staff to triage the calls and support the caller until a Spanish speaking staff could join the call.  The Spanish club also provided information on cultural concerns, community norms, and advice to our staff on the development of the program.

The Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance provides technical support and publications on working in the Latino and Immigrant communities.

Staff

Leslie Moncada joined the team to provide counseling services and also participate in outreach. She provides individual and group counseling for victims of sexual assault and rape as well as support services for victims needing help through the court system and immigration concerns.  She continues to be a valuable part of RCASA’s family and remains a link for us to the Latino Community.

Giovanna Carney came on the project to provide hotline and hospital accompaniment services.  She provides services at any time for victims of violence, family members and community members who call our hotline, accompanies them through the court system and provides outreach in the community.  Giovanna will be moving to a case management and legal advocacy and outreach position in July as we receive additional funding from Kaiser Permanente to enhance and expand our services to the Latino and Immigrant communities.

Leslie Fannon started as a student volunteer from University of Mary Washington who is bi-lingual in Spanish and English.  She started as a volunteer on the hotline to provide hotline and medical accompaniment services and translation services for Spanish speaking survivors and their families.  She translated many of our documents for data and client use.She then became an administrative assistant to provide program support.  After graduation from UMW, she left Fredericksburg to pursue graduate studies but remains on our volunteer hotline support team to provide phone support services to survivors of violence.

Nilsa Correa was hired on the project to be a program assistant for the counseling program.  She helped clients seeking counseling services set up appointments, provided phone support for Spanish-speaking survivors and their families, assisted in liaison duties with community partners and in the translation of documents.  She has since returned to Puerto Rico but remains in touch with RCASA.

Sylvia Torres was hired on the project to provide weekend hotline and medical accompaniment services.  She was an invaluable part of the project from the beginning to set up services within the Latino community, provide crisis and emergency support and follow-up with the families.  While she remains full-time at RCDV, she continues to provide help and support for RCASA staff.

Our Latino Services Program

Our Latino services program provides services to survivors of sexual assault, rape, dating violence, and sexual abuse to the Spanish speaking community.

Our intervention services include:  24-hotline support, medical and forensic accompaniment, legal advocacy and court accompaniment, and counseling (both group and individual).

Our education services include outreach to the community, participation in community events, brochures, flyers and other information in Spanish, and prevention curriculums.   Just email education@rcasa.org if you want us to attend or provide a training or email casemanagement@rcasa.org if you need legal advocacy.

The Future of our Latino Program

FACT’s funding has helped us significantly get our Latino program off the ground and build our relationship with the Latino community.  As we move into this coming fiscal year, Kaiser Permanente steps in to provide $50,000 in funding to continue and enhance our program.  With Kaiser’s support, we will be able to serve more people from the Latino and Immigrant communities through direct services and outreach.  We will implement Patient Navigators to help Spanish speaking and immigrant survivors of sexual assault and abuse through crisis, medical and forensic services, legal advocacy and prosecution, and counseling services.   Many of our current staff will continue in their roles and grow into new roles.  Giovanna will move from hotline support to a regular daily presence in the agency to provide outreach to the community, crisis support, medical/forensic/and legal advocacy, and navigation through allied community partners.  Leslie Moncada will continue providing counseling services to survivors and their families. Dilcia Molina and Madre Tierra will continue to provide support and help on the continued development of our program.  And we will continue to seek technical advice from our sister anti-violence agencies: Rappahannock Council on Domestic Violence, Services for Abuse Families, The Haven, and The Virginia Sexual And Domestic Violence Action Alliance.

RCASA’s Saturday Prevention: Sex education: Talking to your school-age child about sex

In Education, Outreach, Prevention on June 19, 2010 at 8:00 am

Sex education doesn’t need to be a single tell-all discussion. Follow your child’s cues about what he or she needs to know — and when.

Sex education often begins as simple anatomy lessons during the toddler years. But during the school-age years your child might start asking specific questions about sex. Not sure what to say? Consider this guide to discussing sex with your school-age child.

Expect detailed questions

Toddlers and preschoolers are often satisfied with vague answers to questions about where babies come from. But school-age children tend to ask more specific questions about the connection between sexuality and making babies. As your child’s questions about sex become more complex — and perhaps more embarrassing — he or she may turn to friends or other sources for information.

When your school-age child inquires about sex, ask what he or she already knows. Correct any misconceptions, and then offer enough details to answer the specific questions. Don’t laugh at your child’s questions or use nicknames for your child’s sexual anatomy, which may send the signal that these body parts shouldn’t be discussed.

Privacy. Children need to understand from the time that they’re very young that no one is allowed to touch their private parts unless Mommy or Daddy says it’s OK (at the doctor’s, for example), and that the child should tell a trusted adult about any such touching. Kids sometimes play doctor, or “I’ll-show-you-mine-if-you-show-me-yours” — that’s common because children are naturally curious about each other’s bodies — but let them know in a gentle way that other forms of play are better because they respect everyone’s privacy.

Consider these examples:

What’s an erection? You might say, “A boy’s penis is usually soft. But sometimes it gets hard and stands away from the body. This is called an erection.” Describe how an erection can happen while a boy is sleeping or when his penis is touched. This might also be the time to describe a wet dream.

What’s a period? You might say, “A period means that a girl’s body is mature enough to become pregnant.” Explain how menstruation is an important part of the reproductive cycle. You might offer details on bleeding and feminine hygiene products.

How do people have sex? If your child wonders about the mechanics of sex, be honest. You might say, “The man puts his penis inside the woman’s vagina.” Consider using a book with illustrations or diagrams to help your child understand.

Can two girls have sex? Or two boys? It might be enough to say, “Yes. There are many types of intimate relationships.” If your child wants to know more, you might take the opportunity to talk about respect for others or to share your personal thoughts about homosexuality.

What’s masturbation? You might say, “Masturbation is when a boy rubs his penis or a girl rubs her vaginal area.” Remind your child that masturbation is a normal — but private — activity.

The goal is to inform and protect your children while making them feel good — not ashamed — of their bodies.  Even if you’re uncomfortable, forge ahead. Remember, you’re setting the stage for open, honest discussions in the years to come.

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